Previous Page  6 / 12 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 6 / 12 Next Page
Page Background

LEADERSHIP

HOW YOUR COMPANY CAN SEEK GREATER INCLUSION,

ACCORDING TO JEWELL PARKINSON, HEAD OF HUMAN

RESOURCES AT SAP NORTH AMERICA

DEMAND COMMITMENT FROM THE TOP.

Diversity and inclusion needs to be a clear and well-known

priority from an organization’s top leaders who don’t just

talk, but take action. Business leaders who are committed

to driving D&I practices in their own functions or

teams, and can talk openly about company efforts,

and their progress and importance, are critical

to success. Executive teams that strive to be

more diverse themselves also set the right

example for the rest of the workforce.

SET CLEAR BENCHMARKS.

Clearly measuring and transparently communicating progress

to employees is key, even when the message is that there

is still more work ahead. In fact, using employee surveys

and other feedback channels to capture workforce

sentiment is an exceptionally effective way of

making diversity an organization-wide priority.

While it starts at the top, employee support

and activism is what will keep progress

from stalling and encourages course

correction where needed.

DON’T STOP AT THE HIRE.

A program designed to hire diverse candidates is certainly

admirable, but it’s crucial to emphasize creating

and implementing programs that will empower

employees of all types throughout the entire

talent lifecycle, from “hire to retire.” At the

heart of these programs should be the

underlying objective to foster an inclusive

workforce that encourages employees

to bring their most authentic selves

to work every day, without

judgment or bias.

Sponsored Content